Football still No.1 for Sarah Walsh

It's just as well women are renowned for their ability to multi-task. Sydney FC striker Sarah Walsh needs three diaries to keep up to speed with where she needs to be on any given day.

It's just as well women are renowned for their ability to multi-task.

Sydney FC striker Sarah Walsh needs three diaries to keep up to speed with where she needs to be on any given day.

When she's not scoring goals for the Sky Blues in the W-League, the 28-year-old can be found working at Football Federation Australia as an education officer.

And then there is a university bachelor of business degree (marketing) to juggle.

Throw in training, gym sessions, physio appointments and duties with the Matildas and Walsh could be forgiven for waking up each morning wondering what day it is.

"You have to get your time management skills in place...I still haven't fully mastered it yet," she said with a laugh.

"I am still rushing around here and there but I am lucky that all three are fairly flexible."

"It keeps me busy and it's tiring at times but so far it's working out pretty well."

Football remains the number one priority and, at the moment, Walsh concedes that could be going better.

Still getting over the disappointment of the Matildas failing to qualify for the London Olympics, Walsh is not convinced Sydney have started the W-League in top shape.

They drew 1-1 with defending champions and grand final nemesis Brisbane before bumping off Victory 2-1.

Not bad but Walsh wants to see an improvement in coming weeks, even if she acknowledges it's not guaranteed given the lift in quality across all teams.

"Results wise we're probably on track and where we thought we would be," she said.

"But we're not that happy with the way we've performed - we've under-performed, especially against Brisbane."

"That might have something to do with the standard rising across the board."

"That's brilliant for the league but we want to be playing better."

Walsh's on-field commitments give way to off-field responsibilities a couple of days a week, with football still a sharp focus.

Alongside fellow Matilda Sally Shipard, Walsh helps implement FFA's Alcohol and Illicit Drug Education program.

"We've trained up 40-50 A-league, W-league and Matildas players and sent them out with the presentations to deliver in the football community through secondary schools," she explained.

"Sally and I are given different regions to work with and we co-ordinate all the programs so we are kept pretty busy but it's very satisfying work."

The word 'busy' is reoccurring in any conversation with Walsh but unfortunately that won't be the case when the London Olympic flame is lit next year.

The Matildas have missed out on qualification for the second campaign running.

"It hurt last time and I'm sure it will hurt again not being there when it all starts," Walsh confessed.

"There's not much on the international horizon now until the Asian Cup (qualifiers next year)."

We're sure Walsh will have no problem filling in what little extra time she has.